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Friday, June 27, 2014

Featured Video: Hazel Rayfield on Encausticbord

"The quality of the Encausticbord products is great, the panels and cradles are made for the purpose and this shows, I really enjoy working with these supports. . . makes Encaustic even more fun!" ~Hazel Rayfield

Self taught painter, Hazel Rayfield, has been enjoying working with encaustics for the past several years and recently took some time to share her technique with us on Encausticbord™.  

Hazel has been working in a variety of media throughout her painting career, including oil, acrylic and watercolor, but she has found a passion for encaustic.  "I find working with wax as a painting medium can be a challenge but I just love to see what I can do with it, it is very versatile, from thin layers on card to deep layers on solid supports.  The texture and the sheen of the wax is amazing and it has endless possibilities," she explains.

In the following videos from our YouTube channel, Hazel demonstrates both our Encausticbord and R+F encaustic paints.  She works in several ideas on the Artist Trading Card size of Encausticbord and completes an entire piece on a cradled board.




To follow Hazel's blog, check her out online at:  www.artinwax.co.uk.

All things Ampersand, 
Karyn Meyer-Berthel 
Artist & Social Media Specialist 
Ampersand Art Supply 

Click here to explore the full selection of Ampersand panels and tools.

Friday, June 20, 2014

Ampersand Art Supply Sampler Packs

If you are new to Ampersand panels, or if you'd like to introduce an artist friend to Ampersand, then the Sampler packs might be just what you need.  

You can find the Museum Sampler pack including Aquabord™, Gessobord™, Pastelbord™, Claybord, Hardbord and Scratchbord™ in a 5" x 7" or 8" x 10" size.  Or, you can try the panels individually in smaller sizes, like the Aquabord starter pack which includes a 3 pack of 5" x 7" and singles of 8" x 10", 9" x 12" and 11" x 14 flat panels.  There are also starter packs of Claybord, Gessobord, Encausticbord and Artist Panel with variations on cradle size.  Lastly, the Stampbord samplers are great deals for those that need miniature size panels or work in crafting.  

All things Ampersand, 
Karyn Meyer-Berthel 
Artist & Social Media Specialist 
Ampersand Art Supply 

Click here to explore the full selection of Ampersand panels and tools.

Friday, June 13, 2014

Featured Artist: Trilby Wood

Award winning Atlanta artist, Trilby Wood is known for her portraits of children, painting hundreds of commissions in the last 25 years.  Her soft pastel work captures the beauty of the human face and the likeness of the subject, in moments of thoughtful joy and peacefulness.  Her skillful work shows years of watching faces and deep study in the medium of pastel.  It's no wonder that Trilby's work is in collections nationwide as well as numerous publications throughout the years.

Trilby has always been interested in drawing, seeking out classes at Traphagen School of Art when she was in grade school and continually studying drawing throughout high school and college, at Boston University and the University of Texas.  After taking a significant twenty year break from portraiture, Trilby found night classes in pastel in Houston to revive her love of the work.  She took the next few years to build clientele and do live portraits on the weekends before she felt confident to move to Atlanta and start a full time business as a portrait artist.  Trilby marketed herself through local arts and crafts shows, gaining work via word of mouth and building a thriving business.

Trilby's glowing pastel work is often large scale, as many of her portraits are full length.  Before finding Pastelbord™, she was dry mounting her work, which is an unpredictable and time consuming process and is difficult to ship.  After finding Pastelbord through a art magazine, she was thrilled to work with an easy, already built product.  Not to mention, Trilby also found that her color was brighter and fresher.  

Since Trilby's work is large scale, she is often ordering custom cut boards.  A careful drawing before she orders the Pastelbord allows her to be accurate with the custom sizes.  Trilby offers more advice for using larger Pastelbord panels, "If I am doing a large piece, after my first application of pastel, I will spread the color out and blend with a styrofoam peanut to get the surface covered.  Also, I have some strips of velcro attached to a masonite board that stays attached to my easel.  I attach a strip of velcro to the back of my Pastelbord so that my artwork is held firmly to the easel by the velcro.  This works great for me.  Lastly, I have found that if I have done something to disrupt the surface of the board, covering the area with Golden's Acrylic Ground for Pastels easily solved my problem."


Trilby's busy schedule only allows for commissions right now, and there is a 2+ year waiting list.  Her most recent show is the Southeastern Pastel Society's 16th International Juried Exhibition at Oglethorpe University's Museum of Art, which included one of her portraits on the show invitation and catalogue.  The show runs through June 22, 2014.  You can also see more of Trilby's work and proposition her for a piece via her website:  trilbywood.com

All things Ampersand, 
Karyn Meyer-Berthel 
Artist & Social Media Specialist 
Ampersand Art Supply 

Click here to explore the full selection of Ampersand panels and tools.

Friday, June 6, 2014

Acrylic Painting on Claybord by Rock Newcomb

A few years ago, I discovered the advantages of painting on Claybord™. Paintings on Claybord, as they move from my studio to galleries all over the world, are not affected by the humidity and temperature changes that cause the contraction you experience with canvas. The luminosity of the clay surface along with the sgraffito techniques I use make my paintings come alive.

Step 1: Sketching and Laying in Patterns and Washes
Since Claybord is forgiving, I can draw and rework pencil drawings right on the surface.  After sketching, I used a mixture of Burnt Umber and Mars Black to lay in the bold dark patterns on the pots. Claybord is very absorbent so your paint will dry quickly. Using subtle washes, I then concentrated on the shaded areas on the prehistoric Indian ceramics. This began to develop form in space. Make sure you use a matte medium when diluting your acrylics with water to preserve the integrity of your paint.
One of the great advantages of Claybord is the layering of color you can achieve. Using warm earth tones (sepia, burnt umber, raw umber, transparent red iron oxide and cadmium orange), I established the ground and the background. To further develop the form of each object I used many layers of very diluted sepia and raw umber washes, which warm the objects.


Step 2: Creating Texture and Detail
One of the advantages of Claybord is that the thick clay surface allows me to incise right into my paintings. I carved, sanded, and erased through the acrylic paints with sgraffito methods to cause the ceramics to look very, very old. I use razors, scratch knives, or just about anything to work the clay surface of the board. I then painted in areas with sepia, and highlighted them again by scratching back to the white of the board or to a lighter layer of color underneath. Using these sgraffito methods you would swear there were pits and holes in the ceramics. After I finished carving into the surface, I went over all the painted patterns on the ceramics where they are in direct light and applied a 50/50 wash of titanium white to reemphasize the light. Then, I cut in highlights to define the worn spots 

Step 3: Creating other Textures
Both the Claybord’s surface and rigidity provide me an opportunity to experiment with different materials, often using mixed media at virtually any stage of the painting. For example, I wanted the petroglyphs to appear as they had been pecked into the stone background. I sketched the images of four quail and a vortex and then brushed art masking fluid onto these drawings using a small stiff brush in a pointillist style (small dots) allowing some of the under painting to show through. I then painted over the dry masking fluid with a wash of sepia and red iron oxide and then peeled off the masking fluid, which revealed a somewhat darker background with a lighter image of the quail and the vortex. Then, I darkened the ground with sepia and red iron oxide, which gave it the appearance of the texture of stone, and added diagonal stripes of what appears to be mortar.

FinishingOne of the exciting aspects of finishing a piece on Claybord is the ease of framing without glass. To protect and finish off the piece, I airbrush two to three coats of Golden's UVLS polymer varnish (70% gloss, 30% matte, 100% water). Strain the mixture through a paper towel (doubled) each time before using. Now my collectors can enjoy the luminous quality of my work without glass!
 
Rock Newcomb 
Ampersand Art Supply 

Click here to explore the full selection of Ampersand panels and tools.